Last edited by Majind
Thursday, July 16, 2020 | History

3 edition of NATO theater nuclear forces found in the catalog.

NATO theater nuclear forces

NATO theater nuclear forces

modernization and arms control

  • 190 Want to read
  • 32 Currently reading

Published by Library of Congress, Congressional Research Service in [Washington, DC] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • North Atlantic Treaty Organization,
  • Nuclear weapons

  • Edition Notes

    StatementStanley R. Sloan
    SeriesMajor studies and issue briefs of the Congressional Research Service -- 1981-82, reel 6, fr. 0027
    ContributionsLibrary of Congress. Congressional Research Service
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Pagination29 p.
    Number of Pages29
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15451907M

    Events of the last two years have all but ended NATO's nuclear predicament-how to frighten Soviet leaders enough without scaring its own citizens too much-and so the time is ripe for taking stock. Daalder's richly documented and cleanly written history will .   The concept of the US, with such an impressive nuclear arsenal, sharing its nuclear weapons with non-nuclear states seems to completely defy the original aims of the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty (NPT). Is it perhaps alarming then, that a significant international military alliance with twenty-eight members, two of which are nuclear weapon states, subscribes to.

    ) on the Warsaw Pact threat to NATO issued by the Working Group in February Part III, which considers contingencies in which Pact forces might be used, was issued as a separate report by the Working Group in April. Part IV estimates Pact military reactions to alternative US-NATO force struc-tures and strategies. A summary of this. He helped found the Army’s School of Advanced Military Studies and published widely in military and foreign affairs while on active duty. In , he drafted NATO’s Theater Nuclear Force Improvement Study and wrote the final draft of FM Operations in

    Moreover, NATO continues to underscore the principle of nuclear burden-sharing, both through the deployment of US nuclear weapons in a number of NATO states and by agreement that, in the event of war, some of these weapons would be transferred to allied forces and delivered by allied aircraft. The United States will make available its strategic nuclear forces, and commit nuclear weapons forward-deployed to Europe, to the defense of NATO. These forces provide an essential political and military link between Europe and North America and are the supreme guarantee of Alliance security.


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NATO theater nuclear forces Download PDF EPUB FB2

A tactical nuclear weapon (TNW) or non-strategic nuclear weapon is a nuclear weapon which is designed to be used on a battlefield in military situations mostly with friendly forces in proximity and perhaps even on contested friendly territory.

Generally smaller in explosive power, they are defined in contrast to strategic nuclear weapons: which are designed to be mostly targeted in the enemy. Get this from a library. The modernization of NATO's long-range theater nuclear forces: report.

[Simon Lunn; Library of Congress. Foreign Affairs and National Defense Division.; United States. Congress. House. Committee on Foreign Affairs. Subcommittee on Europe and the Middle East.]. The Third World War: The Untold Story () is an alternative history novel by Sir John Hackett portraying a fictional Third World War between NATO and the Warsaw Pact forces, which breaks out in It is written in the style of a non-fiction, post-event historical account.

It was published in by Macmillan in New York and Sidgwick & Jackson in : Sir John Hackett. Get this from a library.

Modernizing NATO's long-range theater nuclear forces: an assessment. [Thomas L McNaugher; Theodore M Parker; Rand Corporation.] -- Analyzes the political and military background of the decision by the NATO Foreign and Defense Ministers, in Decemberto modernize NATO's long-range theater nuclear forces (LRTNF), in response.

Furthermore, the ministers expressed concern that the Soviet Union had gained an advantage over NATO in "Long-Range Theater Nuclear Forces" (LRTNF), and also significantly increased short-range theater nuclear capacity.

To address these developments, the ministers adopted two policy "tracks" which Joseph Stalin had created in Location: White House, Washington, D.C. @article{osti_, title = {NATO long-range theater nuclear force modernization: Rationale and utility.

(sanitized). Final report, 15 October January }, author = {Parker, T.M. and Dean, R.W. and Kephart, D.C. and Laupa, A. and Malone, P.}, abstractNote = NATO theater nuclear forces book report deals with the background and rationale for long-range theater nuclear force (TNF) modernization, the roles and.

Nuclear weapons are a core component of NATO’s overall capabilities for deterrence and defence, alongside conventional and missile defence forces.

NATO is committed to arms control, disarmament and non-proliferation, but as long as nuclear weapons exist, it will remain a nuclear alliance. It then traces the development within the NATO Nuclear Planning Group of the more detailed doctrine concerning the role of theater nuclear weapons within the overall strategy, which led inter alia to the decision taken by NATO in to modernize the long-term component of the theater nuclear forces.

The five NATO countries that share U.S. nuclear weapons are all parties to the NPT, PTBT, and have signed and ratified the CTBT.

[21] Use of Nuclear Weapons. NATO adopts a policy of calculated ambiguity and does not determine in advance how it would react to aggression. NATO Los Angeles Cahuenga Blvd W, # Los Angeles, CA USA [email protected] +1   NATO and the Strategic Nuclear Balance modernization of our tactical and theater nuclear forces would be necessary to meet the requirements li s.

Thirty years ago, on 12 DecemberNATO defense and foreign ministers made a landmark decision designed to unify the alliance, but which also contributed to the collapse of détente and helped provide an agenda for the end of the Cold War.

On the anniversary of the NATO?dual track decision. that linked U.S. deployments of long-range theater nuclear forces (LRTNF) to proposals for. Sloss L. () The Roles of Strategic and Theatre Nuclear Forces in NATO Strategy: Part II.

In: O’neill R. (eds) Doctrine, the Alliance and Arms Control. International Institute for Author: Leon Sloss. “NATO bombing of Serbia was undertaken by the ‘international community,’ according to consistent Western rhetoric—although those who did not have their heads buried in the sand knew that it was opposed by most of the world, often quite vocally.

Abstract. The relationship between NATO's perception of the Soviet threat and its military strategy and nuclear planning are examined. In particular, two mutually interactive relationships are assessed: (1) the extent to which NATO strategy and nuclear planning have been shaped by the objective Soviet threat, as opposed to subjective and internal factors; and (2) the extent to which NATO's.

But the rationale for this modernization of NATO’s theater nuclear forces was more specific. It was approved by NATO and formulated by the High Level Group of the NATO Nuclear Planning Group, a body of high-level government officials in charge of reviewing nuclear forces under NATO command in Europe.

Analyzes the political and military background of the decision by the NATO Foreign and Defense Ministers, in Decemberto modernize NATO's long-range theater nuclear forces (LRTNF), in response to the Soviet : Thomas L McNaugher, Theodore M Parker. NATO is currently considering the modernization of its long-range theater nuclear force (TNF), i.e., those nuclear forces based in Europe that can reach the Soviet homeland.

This activity began in early when the Defense Planning Committee selected ten long-term priority program areas, one of which dealt with TNF modernization, andAuthor: T M Parker, R W Dean, D C Kephart, A Laupa, P Malone.

This handbook has been designed to identify the elements of the NATO Theater Nuclear Force structure and the corresponding threat assets of the Soviet/Warsaw pack forces. The document is intended to serve as a basic reference book for government and contract personnel participating in the DoD TNF S3 Program.

The first three sections describe the NATO TNF assets and Soviet/Warsaw Pact threats Author: R. Klein, C. Potter, J. Semrad, S. Willard, G. Williams. With these deployments (which were carried out over considerable public opposition in West Germany and Great Britain), NATO's theater nuclear forces added a significant new military force.

Highly accurate, constantly ready, and operationally mobile, the Pershing II and GLCM missile systems set the stage for renewed treaty negotiations. The key alliance strategic rationale for nuclear forces based in Europe and committed to NATO is that they "provide an essential political and military link between the European and the North American members of the Alliance [and] with strategic nuclear forces." Linkage to U.S.

strategic nuclear forces was an integral part of NATO's strategy.As NATO attempts to find its “appropriate mix” of deterrence and defense forces through the posture-review process, important questions about the alliance’s nuclear forces, and especially about the continued presence in Europe of U.S.

theater nuclear weapons, can and should be raised by the publics and governments of all 28 member.Abstract. The simplest way to categorize nuclear weapons is by range.

In this book Long-Range Nuclear Forces (LNF) 1 are defined as those nuclear forces which have a range greater than kilometers, Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) as those forces with a range of between and kilometers, and Short-Range Nuclear Forces (SNF) as those with a range below : Oliver Ramsbotham.